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10 Speaking Tips for Hospital Leaders (If They Want Staff to Listen to Them)

As a result of speaking to healthcare audiences several times a week, I will share what I have found to be the most effective tips for insuring that your communication with your staff will cause you to be engaging, believable, and effective.

  1. Speak with passion and enthusiasm.  You are in charge while behind the podium and control the mood of the room.  If you’re not excited about your message, no one will be.

  2. Tell great stories about things that happen within your organization. Amazing events unfold daily in hospitals. Use specific department and employee names and make sure you’ve heard the story first hand.

  3. Use repetition when you speak.  If there is a point you want to drive home, say it several times!

  4. Keep it short. Healthcare employees are overwhelmed and feel like they can’t have too much more on their plate so don’t overwhelm them with details.

  5. Give the audience what they need.  Encourage, validate and celebrate them while delivering your message.  Do so even if the message is difficult to deliver.

  6. Know your audience.  Meet them before you speak by going to all 4 corners of the room and ‘making friends’.  That way you have gained huge support before you ever begin.

  7. Make eye contact with each person, causing you to connect.  Avoid looking at the floor or the podium.

  8. Don’t be a fast talker.  Speak slower than you would in a normal conversation, allowing the audience to track with you.

  9. End BIG!  Don’t trail off at the end.  Give them a call to action that will send them running from the room.

  10. Connect your message to your mission.  Remind them that we are in this together, pulling in the same direction to care for patients and the people who love them the very same way that you would want to be treated.

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